Logo-Super-P h

 

 

images/Redes-Sociales/Facebook-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/YouTube-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/Google-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/LinkedIn-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/Twitter-OFF.png 

Call now to make an appointment (713) 772-6567

Eye Care Myths

The Truth Behind Them

As medical science has progressed, it has busted quite a few myths we have about different parts of the body. Sadly, some of them still linger. Dr Vandana Jain, a Cornea and External Diseases Specialist and the Co-founder and Director of the Advanced Eye Hospital busts some common myths about the human eye:

Myth: Reading in dim light is harmful for your eyes.

Fact: Using your eyes in dim light does not cause damage. It is true however, that good lighting makes for easier reading and can prevent your eyes from tiring out. If you don’t blink enough, it may also cause some dryness. But that’s about it. How else did our great grandparents read or sew by candlelight before the invention of the tube light?

Myth: A cataract must be ripe before it is removed.

Fact: With modern cataract surgery, it is not true. When a cataract keeps you from doing the things you like or need to do, you should consider a removal.

Myth: Children will outgrow Crossed eyes.

Fact: Infants’ eyes are known to occasionally wander until they are 6 months old. However, if you notice your child’s eyes crossing even a little bit, you should get them checked by an Ophthalmologist. Untreated squints can go on to develop amblyopia or lazy eye which can cause permanent loss of vision.

Myth: Eyes can be transplanted.

Fact: The entire eye cannot be transplanted. Once the optic nerve (the nerve connecting the eye and the brain) has been cut off, it cannot be reconnected. However, the cornea (the outer transparent part of the front of the eye) can be transplanted. Also, during Cataract surgery, artificial lenses can be implanted.

Myth: Sitting too close to the television can damage children’s eyes

Fact: Sitting closer than required may cause headaches, but not eye damage. Children have a shorter focal distance than us adults, so they won’t strain their eyes. Oh, but if you own a television set from the 60’s, you might be at risk from radiation emitted by the TV screen!

Myth: People with weak eyes should not read fine print.

Fact: Focusing on intricate details or reading fine print does not damage the already weak eye. Your eyes are just like a camera and using them to photograph fine details won’t wear them out.

Source: thehealthsite

250616 Keratoconus Specialized in Houston

Keratoconus Specialized in Houston.

Orthokeratology Doctor in Houston, Pediatric Optometrist in Houston, Pediatric Eye Clinic, Pedro Gomez OD, Pediatric Optometry in Houston, Ortho-K Doctor in Houston, Orthokeratology Doctor in Houston, Non Surgical Corneal Molding Doctor in Houston, Non-Surgical Vision Correction Doctor in Houston, Ortho-K Specialized in Houston, Orthokeratology Specialized in Houston, Non Surgical Corneal Molding Specialized in Houston, Non-Surgical Vision Correction Specialized in Houston, Keratoconus Therapy in Houston, Keratoconus Doctor in Houston, Keratoconus Specialized in Houston, Wave Contact Lenses in Houston, Eye Conditions Therapy in Houston, Amblyopia Therapy in Houston, Conjunctivitis Therapy in Houston, Strabismus treatment in Houston, Dry Eye treatment in Houston.