Logo-Super-P h

 

 

images/Redes-Sociales/Facebook-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/YouTube-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/Google-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/LinkedIn-OFF.pngimages/Redes-Sociales/Twitter-OFF.png 

Call now to make an appointment (713) 772-6567

What Are Scleral Lenses?

What Do They Do?

The design and manufacture of scleral lenses has been a story of technological development significant for improvement in comfort, material, and affinity for the ocular surface.

.

For many years the lenses were partially molded and partially ground from the material of which hard contact lenses are made: PMMA (poly-methyl methacrylate) known as Plexiglas or Perspex. To form these lenses, like tooth implants, a plaster cast is made from a negative mold prepared from dental impression putty. The plastic would be heated and given the shape of the fitting surface of the lens from the plaster cast and then the power and edge curves would be ground onto the outside surface of the lens. Later came preformed trial sets not unfamiliar to those which we use today.

The current generation of scleral lens fitting began sometime in the last fifteen years with the mating of advanced corneal topography measurements, computer driven lathes and the observations of some very clever contact lens scientists. Proprietary designs of scleral lenses offering a variety of diameters, fitting philosophies, and multiple parameters are filling the gaps contact lens specialists have been wrestling with using smaller corneal contact lens designs for decades with less than optimal results. Most recently a firm has begun manufacturing lenses with a 3-D printer from an image generated from the eye. One eye…one lens, the lens is meant to fit like a fingerprint.

When discussing contact lens treatment, experts are experts because they agree that, any sort, size, or design of lens will have both positive and negative effects on the eyes and the tissues surrounding them. While it is true that many of the fitting and comfort issues confronted with corneal lenses of any size and design can be managed well with scleral designs, the scleral lens can also be difficult for some patients; for some eyes; for some conditions.

From the outset the larger size of the today’s scleral lens provides comfort on par with soft contact lenses for exactly the same reason: their size. Also, like soft contact lenses the scleral will not move around on the surface of the eye allowing the wearer a much more relaxed contact lens experience — there is no necessity to balance small corneal lenses between tense eyelids – vision can be enjoyed in any direction of gaze. The lenses will not fall off the eye and the increased size is a clear plus in finding a dropped contact lens.

Source: discoveryeye

23 Pediatric Optometrist in Houston

Pediatric Optometrist in Houston.

Orthokeratology Doctor in Houston, Pediatric Optometrist in Houston, Pediatric Eye Clinic, Pedro Gomez OD, Pediatric Optometry in Houston, Ortho-K Doctor in Houston, Orthokeratology Doctor in Houston, Non Surgical Corneal Molding Doctor in Houston, Non-Surgical Vision Correction Doctor in Houston, Ortho-K Specialized in Houston, Orthokeratology Specialized in Houston, Non Surgical Corneal Molding Specialized in Houston, Non-Surgical Vision Correction Specialized in Houston, Keratoconus Therapy in Houston, Keratoconus Doctor in Houston, Keratoconus Specialized in Houston, Wave Contact Lenses in Houston, Eye Conditions Therapy in Houston, Amblyopia Therapy in Houston, Conjunctivitis Therapy in Houston, Strabismus treatment in Houston, Dry Eye treatment in Houston