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Clues to Eye Problems in Kids

Pediatric Eye Clinic

1. Watch out for “the glow” in photos of your kids. Do you “know the glow?” I didn’t, until the folks from an organization of the same name reached out to me. Apparently, if your child’s eyes emit a white or golden glow in photos, that’s evidence of Leukocoria, or an abnormal red-eye reflex that’s common to many eye conditions, such as amblyopia, cataracts, and some forms of eye cancer, including retinoblastoma. Some 1 in 80 kids will exhibit “the glow” in photos. If yours does, the doctors at Know the Glow suggest you talk to your pediatrician and ask for a red reflex screening of the eyes. Many eye conditions resolve themselves completely in children when caught early. For more information, check out Know the Glow.

2. Eye rubbing can be a sign that a child is logging too much screen time. A recent study of 7- to 12-year-olds found that 7% of children suffer from symptoms of dry eye disease, and those who did were far more likely to be on their smartphones for several hours per day (and less likely to spend time outside) than their peers without the condition. Apparently, we blink less when we look at screens, and that can lead to faster evaporation of the tear film and lead to dry eye, an uncomfortable condition that causes itching, irritation, and in severe cases, vision problems. If your child seems to complaining about his eyes or rubbing them frequently, talk to your pediatrician or a pediatric ophthalmologist; and consider cutting back on screen time. When children in the study did just that, their dry eye symptoms resolved.

3. Some learning challenges are rooted in vision problems. School demands a lot of hard work on the eyes. We might suspect that kids who squint a lot are candidates for a vision screening, but did you know that attention and reading problems might also be linked to eyesight challenges? According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, four underappreciated signs of eye problems in children are:

  • Having a short attention span: Your child is more apt to lose interest in lessons or games because their eyes are straining too hard to keep up.
  • Losing one’s place in a book: Blurring or straining can make it hard to follow along.
  • “Hating” to read: When it’s hard to see a page, reading can be taxing, and not fun.
  • Turning their head to the side: Does it feel like a child isn’t listening, or playing coy, by constantly turning her head when someone is talking? If they have a refractive eye disorder, like an astigmatism, this might help them see better.

Source: happyhealthykids

Pediatric Eye Clinic.

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Pediatric Eye Clinic

 

1. Watch out for “the glow” in photos of your kids. Do you “know the glow?” I didn’t, until the folks from an organization of the same name reached out to me. Apparently, if your child’s eyes emit a white or golden glow in photos, that’s evidence of Leukocoria, or an abnormal red-eye reflex that’s common to many eye conditions, such as amblyopia, cataracts, and some forms of eye cancer, including retinoblastoma. Some 1 in 80 kids will exhibit “the glow” in photos. If yours does, the doctors at Know the Glow suggest you talk to your pediatrician and ask for a red reflex screening of the eyes. Many eye conditions resolve themselves completely in children when caught early. For more information, check out Know the Glow.

 

2. Eye rubbing can be a sign that a child is logging too much screen time. A recent study of 7- to 12-year-olds found that 7% of children suffer from symptoms of dry eye disease, and those who did were far more likely to be on their smartphones for several hours per day (and less likely to spend time outside) than their peers without the condition. Apparently, we blink less when we look at screens, and that can lead to faster evaporation of the tear film and lead to dry eye, an uncomfortable condition that causes itching, irritation, and in severe cases, vision problems. If your child seems to complaining about his eyes or rubbing them frequently, talk to your pediatrician or a pediatric ophthalmologist; and consider cutting back on screen time. When children in the study did just that, their dry eye symptoms resolved.

 

3. Some learning challenges are rooted in vision problems. School demands a lot of hard work on the eyes. We might suspect that kids who squint a lot are candidates for a vision screening, but did you know that attention and reading problems might also be linked to eyesight challenges? According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, four underappreciated signs of eye problems in children are:

 

  • Having a short attention span: Your child is more apt to lose interest in lessons or games because their eyes are straining too hard to keep up.

  • Losing one’s place in a book: Blurring or straining can make it hard to follow along.

  • “Hating” to read: When it’s hard to see a page, reading can be taxing, and not fun.

  • Turning their head to the side: Does it feel like a child isn’t listening, or playing coy, by constantly turning her head when someone is talking? If they have a refractive eye disorder, like an astigmatism, this might help them see better.

 

Source: happyhealthykids

 

Pediatric Eye Clinic.

 

Orthokeratology Doctor in Houston, Pediatric Optometrist in Houston, Pediatric Eye Clinic, Pedro Gomez OD, Pediatric Optometry in Houston, Ortho-K Doctor in Houston, Orthokeratology Doctor in Houston, Non Surgical Corneal Molding Doctor in Houston, Non-Surgical Vision Correction Doctor in Houston, Ortho-K Specialized in Houston, Orthokeratology Specialized in Houston, Non Surgical Corneal Molding Specialized in Houston, Non-Surgical Vision Correction Specialized in Houston, Keratoconus Therapy in Houston, Keratoconus Doctor in Houston, Keratoconus Specialized in Houston, Wave Contact Lenses in Houston, Eye Conditions Therapy in Houston, Amblyopia Therapy in Houston, Conjunctivitis Therapy in Houston, Strabismus treatment in Houston, Dry Eye treatment in Houston.